Selling a Business

Business owners considering selling their company should utilize as many resources as possible.  The New York Times Small Business Page (see link here) has a wealth of information on this topic.  The linked article provides a good overview of what to consider when first thinking about selling a business.  While not detailed, this article, along with additional resources at the site, are a good starting point.

Some good information in the referenced article addresses three questions owners should ask themselves:

 

Can Your Business Be Sold?

Many elements of a business make it attractive to buyers. For example, does it have a solid history of profitability, a large and loyal base of customers, a competitive advantage (intellectual property rights, long-term contracts with clients, exclusive distributorships), opportunities for growth, a desirable location and a skilled work force?

Are You Ready to Sell?

Make sure you are ready, both financially and emotionally. Think about what life will be like after the sale. What will you do — not just for money but also with your time? Many business owners suffer real remorse after handing over their business to a new owner.

Here are a few indicators that it may be time to move on:

¶It’s not fun anymore. Burnout is a very real issue for business owners, and an entirely legitimate reason to sell.

¶You’re not inclined to invest in growth. You may be comfortable with the current size and profitability of your business and have no desire to make the capital expenditures necessary to take it to the next level.

¶You feel your management skills are overmatched. It is not uncommon for business owners to build their business to a certain point and then realize they lack the skill set required to go further.

What’s Your Business Worth?

Many owners have no idea. On one end of the spectrum, for example, was a client who owned a professional services firm. She felt the firm was worth more than $1 million. After a lengthy search, a buyer paid her less than half that amount. Then there was a client who was about to sell his I.T. company to an employee for $200,000. After advertising the business for sale nationwide, he sold it for one dollar shy of $1 million.

Selling a business is both art and science, and in no other area is this more evident than the valuation. While every seller wants to achieve maximum value, setting an asking price that is too high signals to buyers that you may not be serious about selling.

While there are a number of methods used to value a business, the most common formula for smaller transactions is a multiple of seller’s discretionary earnings (S.D.E.). This type of market-based valuation involves recasting profit-and-loss statements — adding back owner’s salary, perks and nonrecurring expenses — to find the S.D.E. of the business and then using comparable data for similar businesses to arrive at an appropriate multiple. (the rest of the article can be found here)

Of course, Apex Counsel also provides substantial resources for business owners.

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